A clear pathway to a climate neutral, healthy and prosperous Menlo Park

A clear pathway to a climate neutral, healthy and prosperous

Menlo Park

BUILDINGS

Clean Power: Moving to clean, renewable energy sources such as solar, and Energy Conservation Saving energy in homes, businesses and city infrastructure.

TRANSPORTATION

More Transportation Choices: Increasing safety and ease of walking and biking, providing more transit choices, and reducing gridlock and congestion, and Clean Vehicles: Supporting high-mileage, zero- and low-carbon vehicles.

SUSTAINABLE LIVING

Promoting additional measures, like reducing waste, to help the Menlo Park reach its climate neutrality goal

How Menlo Park Can Become Climate Neutral by 2025

Menlo Park has made slow and steady progress reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions since the first Climate Action Plan adopted in 2009. City-wide emissions totaled 380,000 tons of carbon dioxide equivalent emissions (CO2e) in 2005 and were reduced to 360,000 tons CO2e by 2013. Almost half of the carbon emissions are from energy dominated by natural gas, while vehicles contribute over 40 percent of emissions (see the chart below for the 2013 inventory).

In 2013, the City adopted a 27% GHG reduction goal from 2005 levels by 2020. The City is actively pursuing climate action plan measures with annual updates to reach the 2020 goal.

What measures will it take to get to climate neutrality – or zero net carbon emissions – in Menlo Park? The following pathway shows the steps to reduce carbon emissions to zero by 2025 with measures that have been successful in other cities and using proven technology.

Menlo Park GHG Emissions in 2013:
360,000 tons C02e

    HOW MUCH CARBON CAN WE REDUCE ALONG A PATHWAY TO ZERO?

    With 327,000 tons of CO2e expected in 2025, how do we change course to reach zero carbon emission by 2025?

    Click on the stepping-stones below to learn more, and find even more info here

    Zero Waste
    (1,500 tons / 0.5% of target)
    San Francisco-style zero waste ordinance achieving 80% reductions in carbon

    Landfill Waste Capture
    (6,500 tons / 2% of target)
    Capture methane from Bayfront Park by 85%.

    Electric Vehicles
    (18,000 tons / 5% of target)
    New ZEV Sales reaching 50% by 2025. (*including any other zero emission vehicles)

    Phasing out Fossil Fuels
    & Electrification of Existing Buildings

    (23,500 tons / 7% of target)
    Electric replacement of natural gas appliances & heating in existing buildings by 20%.

    Household Carbon Footprint Reductions
    (24,000 tons / 7% of target)
    Menlo Green Challenge produces 15% reduction in household carbon emissions through reduced air travel & consumption among 20% of households city-wide.

    Fossil Free (Carbon Free) Buildings
    (22,000 tons / 7% of target)
    Standards for new buildings requiring 80% carbon free energy starting in 2018, with 3% annual building turnover.

    Community Projects
    (30,000 tons 9 % of target)
    Net positive micro-grids, Tree plantings, water efficiency & recycling (purple pipe), local food, cool roofs, cool pavements, and community waste digesters could contribute to significant carbon reductions.

    Clean Grid Power
    (31,000 tons / 9% of target)
    (Community Choice Energy) providing 100% carbon free power with a 15% opt out rate by 2025.

    Energy Efficiency for Existing Buildings
    (31,000 tons / 10% of target)
    Improving efficiency of existing buildings an average of 25%

    Clean Co-Gen
    (31,500 tons / 10% of target)
    Implement Stanford-style energy plant to replace Co-Gen at SRI.

    Alternatives to Driving
    (38,500 tons / 12% of target)
    Driving alternatives could lead to a reduction of traffic by up to 30%. Measures include safer biking & walking routes, bike shares, ample bike parking, e-bikes & e-scooters programs, free zero carbon shuttles, Mobility as a Service (MaaS), expanded carpool services, car shares, paid parking, and free or subsidized GoPasses for Caltrain.

    Additional Measures and New Technology
    (73,000 tons / 22% of target)
    A plentiful supply of verified carbon offsets are available, for example, through CCAR, keeping the emphasis on local emission reductions and considering these a last resort.  Taxes or fees on the carbon content of goods calibrated to reduce consumption of high carbon products and influence behavior. Note: this would be in addition and complimentary to the existing Cap & Trade Program. Numerous examples exist.

    New Technology can also be effective to reduce or sequester carbon emissions, such as cement & concrete materials created using industrial CO2 emissions to form calcium carbonate (similar to the way nature creates things like coral).

    Zero Waste
    (1,500 tons / 0.5% of target)
    X

    Zero Waste
    (1,500 tons / 0.5% of target)

    San Francisco-style zero waste ordinance achieving 80% reductions in carbon
    Landfill Waste Capture
    (6,500 tons / 2% of target)
    X

    Landfill Waste Capture
    (6,500 tons / 2% of target)

    Capture methane from Bayfront Park by 85%.
    Electric Vehicles
    (18,000 tons / 5% of Target
    X

    Electric Vehicles
    (18,000 tons / 5% of Target

    New ZEV Sales reaching 50% by 2025. (*including any other zero emission vehicles)
    Phase out Natural Gas (Electrification)
    (23,500 tons / 7% of target)
    X

    Phasing out Fossil Fuels
    & Electrification of Existing Buildings

    (23,500 tons / 7% of target)

    Electric replacement of natural gas appliances & heating in existing buildings by 20%.
    Household Carbon Footprint Reductions
    (24,000 tons / 7% of target)
    X

    Household Carbon Footprint Reductions
    (24,000 tons / 7% of target)

    Menlo Green Challenge produces 15% reduction in household carbon emissions through reduced air travel & consumption among 20% of households city-wide.
    Energy Efficiency for Existing Buildings
    (31,000 tons / 10% of target)
    X

    Energy Efficiency for Existing Buildings
    (31,000 tons / 10% of target)

    Improving efficiency of existing buildings an average of 25%
    Clean Grid Power
    (31,000 tons / 9% of target)
    X

    Clean Grid Power
    (31,000 tons / 9% of target)

    (Community Choice Energy) providing 100% carbon free power with a 15% opt out rate by 2025.
    Community Projects
    (30,000 tons 9 % of target)
    X

    Community Projects
    (30,000 tons 9 % of target)

    Net positive micro-grids, Tree plantings, water efficiency & recycling (purple pipe), local food, cool roofs, cool pavements, and community waste digesters could contribute to significant carbon reductions.
    Fossil Free (Carbon Free) Buildings
    (22,000 tons / 7% of target)
    X

    Fossil Free (Carbon Free) Buildings
    (22,000 tons / 7% of target)

    Standards for new buildings requiring 80% carbon free energy starting in 2018, with 3% annual building turnover.
    Clean Co-Gen
    (31,500 tons / 10% of target)
    X

    Clean Co-Gen
    (31,500 tons / 10% of target)

    Implement Stanford-style energy plant to replace Co-Gen at SRI.
    Alternatives to Driving
    (38,500 tons / 12% of target)
    X

    Alternatives to Driving
    (38,500 tons / 12% of target)

    Driving alternatives could lead to a reduction of traffic by up to 30%. Measures include safer biking & walking routes, bike shares, ample bike parking, e-bikes & e-scooters programs, free zero carbon shuttles, Mobility as a Service (MaaS), expanded carpool services, car shares, paid parking, and free or subsidized GoPasses for Caltrain.
    Additional Measures and New Technology
    (73,000 tons / 22% of target)
    X

    Additional Measures and New Technology
    (73,000 tons / 22% of target)

    A plentiful supply of verified carbon offsets are available, for example, through CCAR, keeping the emphasis on local emission reductions and considering these a last resort.  Taxes or fees on the carbon content of goods calibrated to reduce consumption of high carbon products and influence behavior. Note: this would be in addition and complimentary to the existing Cap & Trade Program. Numerous examples exist.

    New Technology can also be effective to reduce or sequester carbon emissions, such as cement & concrete materials created using industrial CO2 emissions to form calcium carbonate (similar to the way nature creates things like coral).

    This information is currently our best understanding of what is possible; it is developing over time with input from experts. Please email diane@menlospark.org.

    Here’s Where YOU come in…

    We need everyone to work together towards zero carbon to make it our reality. Carbon emissions are continually changing with the economy, commodity prices, new technology, regulatory and legislative measures, political administrations, public opinion, global development, and ironically, climate change itself (for example, hotter temps lead to more A/C use).

    Achieving climate neutrality in Menlo Park will take clever ideas, a whole lot of hard work, and the community coming together. Join us:

    CLIMATE ACTION: SEE WHAT OTHER CITIES ARE DOING

    Slide over images for details

    Electric Cars in San Jose

    Bicycling to work

    Green Roof Tops

    Free Public Transportation

    Save energy with energy conservation - Boston

    Complete Streets

    Clean Power

    Zero Waste

    “In the story of humanity, everything is impossible, until it becomes possible.”

    – Mayor Ada Colau, Barcelona

    MenloSpark-OakLeaf1

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